Gluten Free/ Loaves + Crackers/ Vegan

The Unbelievable Bread

Gluten and I get along just fine, I’d even go so far as to say that we’re best buds. But, as many of you have probably noticed, I don’t make a ton of glutenous recipes. Most of the time I try to bake with more ancient grains (which still have gluten) such as spelt or kamut, or gluten free alternatives. Over the past couple of years I have slowly been introducing more and more gluten free alternatives into our daily repertoire, and there is reason for this!

Firstly, and most importantly, is the fact that my other half suffers from crohn’s disease. While he has been pretty healthy for the last ten years, I greatly fear any relapse that will cause him severe pain, extreme weight loss, and overall suffering. As a preventative method (and part of a general healthy lifestyle) we limit the amount of gluten, cow dairy, and  processed foods we eat. While there is no clear idea how to manage the disease, these are things we do, and have worked for him thus far, but may not work for everyone.

Secondly, I like to make things that my mum can eat. Over the last few years, she has cut out most flour from her life in order to maintain healthy blood sugar levels and avoid the risk of becoming diabetic. Unlike refined flour, this bread is made from actual grains, both of which are low on the glycemic index, meaning that their glucose breaks down more gradually in the bloodstream and that has a host of healthy benefits!

Thirdly, is the fact that I live with a bunch of carbohydrate enthusiasts, myself included. We love a good slice of toast with jam and nut butter slathered on, it’s comfort food to us in it’s purest form. While it is comforting, I still want it to be as healthy as a snack as it can possibly be. This means relying on many different wholegrain flours and ingredients to introduce a variety of nutrition and vitamins into our diet. Not just one flour all the time!

I spend a good couple of days playing around with different flour combinations and different bread recipes. One day I went as far as to make about four loaves, all of which were unsuccessful. But finally, I made this and it was amazing! It was basically a miracle after all the other breads.

Although it doesn’t taste like a true bread, it is delicious, slices well, and toasts like a dream! I made two different versions, one with all quinoa and one with half quinoa, half millet. Both were delicious, but the addition of millet adds great texture, saves in cost, and has a much more neutral flavour. And I highly recommend toasting the bread as it makes it just that much more amazing!

 

The Unbelievable Bread

Adapted from here and here
Recipe: (Makes 1 loaf) Print it Here
3/4 Cup and 2 Tbsp Raw Quinoa
3/4 Cup and 2 Tbsp Raw Millet
4 Tbsp Psyllium Seed Husk in 1 Cup Water**
1 Tbsp Maple Syrup
3 Tbsp Oil (I used avocado, but coconut would work)
1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
1/2 tsp. Sea Salt
1 Tbsp. Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Cup Water
Seeds such as Sesame, Pumpkin, Flax, or Sunflower for garnish (optional)
Procedure: Soak the millet and quinoa in enough water to cover, leave overnight in the refrigerator, or approximately 8 hrs. Once the grains have been soaked, rinse them well, and let them drain thoroughly.
Meanwhile mix the 4 Tbsp. psyllium with 1 cup warm water, stirring to combine. Let sit for 10 minutes.
Combine the soaked grains, psyllium jell, maple syrup, oil, baking soda, salt, cider vinegar, and extra 1 cup water in a food processor and purée for 2-3 minutes, or until the batter is sticky, but some grains are still visible. You want to be careful not to over-mix it, as the dough will be sticky – I puréed the mixture until it began to ball up in the machine.
Pour the mixture into a greased loaf pan and top with seeds if desired. Bake at 160 C (320 F) for approximately 90 minutes, or until the top of the loaf bounces back when lightly touched. Around 45 minutes in the oven, poke the top of the loaf with the tip of a sharp knife to help extra steam escape (this is an important step. Your bread will rise well in the oven, but you need to pierce the top to let the steam out – it will fall drastically once baked and that’s normal).
Let the loaf sit for a few minutes before removing from pan.Let cool on a wire rack. Wait until the loaf is entirely cool before slicing. Loaf can be wrapped and stored in the refrigerator for up to a week, or sliced and frozen.
 
(** It is best to use Psyllium husk in this recipe. I tried to replace the psyllium with chia, but the results yielded a denser loaf, less reminiscent of bread, and not nearly as tasty. If you absolutely can’t find psyllium, you can replace it with 4 Tbsp chia, soaked in 1/2 water, but be sure to reduce the amount of water used to purée to only 1/2 cup – 3/4 cup. There is also no need to pierce the top of the loaf if using chia, as it won’t rise as much as the psyllium)
 
xox Sophie

146 Comments

  • Reply
    Marla
    February 21, 2014 at 3:06 pm

    This looks amazing! I'm always interested in experimenting with flourless recipes. I can't eat quinoa, though. It gives me horrible tummy aches. Do you think I could sub any other grain to mix with the millet? Thank you!

  • Reply
    Marla
    February 21, 2014 at 3:06 pm

    This looks amazing! I'm always interested in experimenting with flourless recipes. I can't eat quinoa, though. It gives me horrible tummy aches. Do you think I could sub any other grain to mix with the millet? Thank you!

  • Reply
    Shibi Thomas
    February 21, 2014 at 4:54 pm

    That's a nice flourless bread, I liked the texture of it…. dense and seems to me soft too :).

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 22, 2014 at 1:26 am

    Thank you, Marla! I'm sorry quinoa gives you a tummy ache, that's a shame. I only made the recipe with quinoa, and the millet/quinoa blend, but I'm sure other grains would work well too. You could always try using just millet, but that might be a little mealy in texture. Another thought is maybe using buckwheat. Good luck! I would love to hear how it turns out

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 22, 2014 at 1:30 am

    So happy you like it, Shibi. You're right about the texture too, I find it to be a lot like a good whole wheat loaf – you would hardly know there is no flour 🙂

  • Reply
    gingermylk
    February 22, 2014 at 11:03 am

    Looks fantastic! Do you think I could use a blender instead of a food processor? 🙂

  • Reply
    gingermylk
    February 22, 2014 at 11:03 am

    Looks fantastic! Do you think I could use a blender instead of a food processor? 🙂

  • Reply
    Unknown
    February 22, 2014 at 12:37 pm

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • Reply
    Unknown
    February 22, 2014 at 12:37 pm

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • Reply
    Unknown
    February 22, 2014 at 12:38 pm

    Looks yummy! Could psyllium seed husk powder be subbed?

  • Reply
    Unknown
    February 22, 2014 at 12:38 pm

    Looks yummy! Could psyllium seed husk powder be subbed?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 22, 2014 at 6:18 pm

    I'm sure that would work just fine, you may need to reduce the amount to only 3 Tbsp 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 22, 2014 at 6:18 pm

    I'm sure that would work just fine, you may need to reduce the amount to only 3 Tbsp 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 22, 2014 at 6:20 pm

    Hello Gingermylk, if you have a good blender like a VitaMix or a Blendtec, that should be no problem. You may want to try blending it in two batches instead of all at once. I used a 70's food processor, so I'm sure a modern blender would be even more efficient 🙂

  • Reply
    Melissa @ Nourish By Melissa
    February 22, 2014 at 9:55 pm

    This is perfect! I've been searching for a healthy bread recipe that wasn't either, made of oats or purely made out of nuts and seeds and I think I found the perfect recipe 😀 I'm super excited about this one haha can't wait to try it! Thanks for sharing!

  • Reply
    Melissa @ Nourish By Melissa
    February 22, 2014 at 9:55 pm

    This is perfect! I've been searching for a healthy bread recipe that wasn't either, made of oats or purely made out of nuts and seeds and I think I found the perfect recipe 😀 I'm super excited about this one haha can't wait to try it! Thanks for sharing!

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 23, 2014 at 9:42 am

    This looks amazing. I'm trying it today. Just one question, though. What can I use instead of psyllium seed husk?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 23, 2014 at 4:06 pm

    Very few things act as well as psyllium husk in holding things together, but if for some reason you can't eat or find psyllium, you could try chia. I haven't tried using chia in the recipe myself, so I can't speak to how well it works, but I would highly recommend using about 1/2 the amount of water that the recipe calls for. Soak 4 Tbsp chia in 1/2 cup water, then only use about 1/2 cup more water to blend. Good luck 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 23, 2014 at 4:06 pm

    Very few things act as well as psyllium husk in holding things together, but if for some reason you can't eat or find psyllium, you could try chia. I haven't tried using chia in the recipe myself, so I can't speak to how well it works, but I would highly recommend using about 1/2 the amount of water that the recipe calls for. Soak 4 Tbsp chia in 1/2 cup water, then only use about 1/2 cup more water to blend. Good luck 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 23, 2014 at 4:11 pm

    You're welcome, Melissa! I am so pleased you are excited. I know what you mean about the nut breads, yummy, but they are so rich and I just can't bring myself to slather them with almond butter 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 23, 2014 at 4:11 pm

    You're welcome, Melissa! I am so pleased you are excited. I know what you mean about the nut breads, yummy, but they are so rich and I just can't bring myself to slather them with almond butter 🙂

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 23, 2014 at 7:18 pm

    Thank you so much Sophie! I cannot find psyllium husk but I do have chia seeds, so now I'm ready to start!
    Danny

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 23, 2014 at 7:18 pm

    Thank you so much Sophie! I cannot find psyllium husk but I do have chia seeds, so now I'm ready to start!
    Danny

  • Reply
    Julie
    February 24, 2014 at 2:32 am

    Hi Sophie, great recipe!! I tried many gf bread recipes and this is the best. Next time I make it, I might try to blend all the ingredients except the psyllium. It clumped in the blender (i dont have a food processor).
    It's the first time I tried psyllium and it's fantastic! Gf bread are always crumbly..

  • Reply
    Julie
    February 24, 2014 at 2:32 am

    Hi Sophie, great recipe!! I tried many gf bread recipes and this is the best. Next time I make it, I might try to blend all the ingredients except the psyllium. It clumped in the blender (i dont have a food processor).
    It's the first time I tried psyllium and it's fantastic! Gf bread are always crumbly..

  • Reply
    Ksenija Selivanova
    February 24, 2014 at 6:26 pm

    I've given so many attempts to bread, but the yeast just doesn't like me. ( or the opposite) So this is perfect. Thank you for this recipe.Please check my blog full of heels and buns 🙂 http://www.heelsandbuns.com
    x
    K

  • Reply
    Ksenija Selivanova
    February 24, 2014 at 6:26 pm

    I've given so many attempts to bread, but the yeast just doesn't like me. ( or the opposite) So this is perfect. Thank you for this recipe.Please check my blog full of heels and buns 🙂 http://www.heelsandbuns.com
    x
    K

  • Reply
    Agnès
    February 25, 2014 at 9:51 am

    This looks so good, easy and perfect ! I just can"t wait to find psyllium husk ! thank you for this recipe !

  • Reply
    Agnès
    February 25, 2014 at 9:51 am

    This looks so good, easy and perfect ! I just can"t wait to find psyllium husk ! thank you for this recipe !

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 25, 2014 at 5:30 pm

    Try soaking the quinoa with a tbsp of raw apple cider vinegar. That might help.

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 25, 2014 at 5:30 pm

    Try soaking the quinoa with a tbsp of raw apple cider vinegar. That might help.

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 25, 2014 at 6:58 pm

    Do you think ground flax seeds could replace the psyllium? If so would I use the same amount?

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 25, 2014 at 6:58 pm

    Do you think ground flax seeds could replace the psyllium? If so would I use the same amount?

  • Reply
    Harmony
    February 25, 2014 at 8:29 pm

    Did you try it with chia seeds? Did it work?

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 25, 2014 at 8:35 pm

    I also find quinoa upsets my stomach.. I haven't eaten it in years… but I've heard soaking and washing well can help – maybe because it removes the saponin? Anyways, I think I will try this recipe as it sounds to amazing to pass up!

  • Reply
    Liz V
    February 25, 2014 at 11:24 pm

    Try kañiwa instead quinoa, it is way much better and way more nutrients than quinoa. My last trip from Peru, kañiwa bread was the best bread I ever tried.

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 26, 2014 at 4:36 am

    Hate to be "that person" but what is the pjurpose of the oil in the bread? I generally dont add it in my recipies. could the amount be reduced or subbed?

  • Reply
    Trish Cowper
    February 26, 2014 at 2:41 pm

    WOW. I'm impressed. That bread looks great, the texture amazing. I'm not afraid of gluten either but I think adding some GF alternatives to our diet as much as possible is a good idea. Definitely going to try this bread.

  • Reply
    Trish Cowper
    February 26, 2014 at 2:41 pm

    WOW. I'm impressed. That bread looks great, the texture amazing. I'm not afraid of gluten either but I think adding some GF alternatives to our diet as much as possible is a good idea. Definitely going to try this bread.

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 26, 2014 at 6:30 pm

    I was so excited about making this bread. I followed directions exactly. It puffed up beautifully in the oven. Although I had major Pinterest fail. It completely caved in once it cooled down and when I took it out of the pan, the bottom and the sides were wet. I'm guessing it had something to do with steam? I haven't tasted it yet, but kind of feeling depressed about this situation.

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 26, 2014 at 6:30 pm

    I was so excited about making this bread. I followed directions exactly. It puffed up beautifully in the oven. Although I had major Pinterest fail. It completely caved in once it cooled down and when I took it out of the pan, the bottom and the sides were wet. I'm guessing it had something to do with steam? I haven't tasted it yet, but kind of feeling depressed about this situation.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:18 pm

    Hello Julie, so happy you liked the bread. I totally agree about psyllium, is a pretty amazing thing 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:18 pm

    Hello Julie, so happy you liked the bread. I totally agree about psyllium, is a pretty amazing thing 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:31 pm

    You're welcome, Ksenija! I hope you like this bread, or that it likes you 🙂 I'll totally check out your site.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:31 pm

    You're welcome, Ksenija! I hope you like this bread, or that it likes you 🙂 I'll totally check out your site.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:36 pm

    You're welcome, Agnes. You should be able to find psyllium husk at your local health food or drug store 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:36 pm

    You're welcome, Agnes. You should be able to find psyllium husk at your local health food or drug store 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:43 pm

    I haven't tried it, so I'm not sure how well it will work, but it's worth a try 🙂 I would recommend using just as much ground flax as psyllium, but only half the water. Soak the flax in 1/2 cup water, then try adding only 1/2 more water when puréeing. Good luck! I'd love to hear how it turns out.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:43 pm

    I haven't tried it, so I'm not sure how well it will work, but it's worth a try 🙂 I would recommend using just as much ground flax as psyllium, but only half the water. Soak the flax in 1/2 cup water, then try adding only 1/2 more water when puréeing. Good luck! I'd love to hear how it turns out.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:50 pm

    Oh, don't worry about being 'that person' – I am usually the first to cut the oil from recipes too! The oil in the bread helps with texture, flavour, and to crisp it up when toasted. If you want to use less oil, try reducing it to 2 Tbsp or another idea is to replace it with unsweetened apple sauce.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 26, 2014 at 11:50 pm

    Oh, don't worry about being 'that person' – I am usually the first to cut the oil from recipes too! The oil in the bread helps with texture, flavour, and to crisp it up when toasted. If you want to use less oil, try reducing it to 2 Tbsp or another idea is to replace it with unsweetened apple sauce.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 27, 2014 at 12:01 am

    Thank you so much, Trisha! I'm delighted you like the recipe. I would love to know what you think of the bread when you make it 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 27, 2014 at 12:07 am

    All awesome ideas, thanks everyone 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 27, 2014 at 12:24 am

    Oh, no! I feel terrible that you're bummed about the bread, but to me it sounds like you did everything right. It's true that the bread sinks a bit (you can see that in the second photo) – part of this is because the batter creates a crust that prevents the steam from escaping. If you insert the tip of a knife into the bread half way through cooking it will let the steam out and the bread will sink a bit (making more of a brick shape rather than a domed top). As far as the wet sides, I'm not sure what happened there. Taking the bread out of the pan sooner should probably prevent that – you might want to take it out of the pan as soon as it comes out of the oven and leave it on a wrack to cool. You could always toss your loaf back in the oven for a bit to help reduce the dampness of the sides and bottom. I hope it tastes okay after all that! I know that it can be so upsetting when a recipe doesn't turn out as expected.

  • Reply
    davee
    February 28, 2014 at 3:26 pm

    excited to try this today!!
    do you I can use millet Flour rather than raw?
    and flaxseed in place of psyllium?

  • Reply
    Hannah
    February 28, 2014 at 6:00 pm

    This is my new favourite gluten free loaf. Thanks for the recipe!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 1, 2014 at 3:49 pm

    Hello Davee, I am so pleased you are excited to try it! Millet flour wont't yield the same results as whole, soaked millet – it might make the batter all gummy and thick. I recommend using whole millet if you can find it. As far as using ground flaxseed, I attempted to make the loaf with chia last night, but I wasn't nearly as happy with the results. It was much more dense and less "bread-like". I feel that flax seed would produce a similar result. If you absolutely can't find psyllium, you could try chia or flax but you will have to reduce the water used. I updated the recipe to include this, so please see above.
    All the best,

    Sophie

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 1, 2014 at 3:49 pm

    Hello Davee, I am so pleased you are excited to try it! Millet flour wont't yield the same results as whole, soaked millet – it might make the batter all gummy and thick. I recommend using whole millet if you can find it. As far as using ground flaxseed, I attempted to make the loaf with chia last night, but I wasn't nearly as happy with the results. It was much more dense and less "bread-like". I feel that flax seed would produce a similar result. If you absolutely can't find psyllium, you could try chia or flax but you will have to reduce the water used. I updated the recipe to include this, so please see above.
    All the best,

    Sophie

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 1, 2014 at 3:49 pm

    Thank you, Hannah! I'm so happy you like it 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 1, 2014 at 3:49 pm

    Thank you, Hannah! I'm so happy you like it 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 1, 2014 at 4:09 pm

    Hello, I tried it using 4 Tbsp chia soaked in 1/2 water, then only about 3/4 of a cup water (instead of 1 cup) to purée the mixture. The chia loaf was more dense, and less "bread-like", but it still worked out well. If you can't find the psyllium, chia will definitely do. One note, however, is because the loaf doesn't rise as much, it doesn't not need to be pierced half-way through cooking and will not sink slightly like the psyllium loaf .

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 1, 2014 at 4:09 pm

    Hello, I tried it using 4 Tbsp chia soaked in 1/2 water, then only about 3/4 of a cup water (instead of 1 cup) to purée the mixture. The chia loaf was more dense, and less "bread-like", but it still worked out well. If you can't find the psyllium, chia will definitely do. One note, however, is because the loaf doesn't rise as much, it doesn't not need to be pierced half-way through cooking and will not sink slightly like the psyllium loaf .

  • Reply
    kittenbiscuit
    March 2, 2014 at 4:29 pm

    I made this last night and I'm very pleased with the results! Thank you!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 3, 2014 at 1:47 am

    You're welcome! I'm so happy you like it 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 3, 2014 at 1:47 am

    You're welcome! I'm so happy you like it 🙂

  • Reply
    Jamie Underwood
    March 4, 2014 at 4:30 am

    I've got mine in the oven now. Excited to see the out come.

  • Reply
    Jamie Underwood
    March 4, 2014 at 4:30 am

    I've got mine in the oven now. Excited to see the out come.

  • Reply
    Reut Sapir
    March 4, 2014 at 3:09 pm

    Hello, will psyllium seed husk fiber powder do the trick? Thanks 🙂

  • Reply
    Reut Sapir
    March 4, 2014 at 3:09 pm

    Hello, will psyllium seed husk fiber powder do the trick? Thanks 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 5, 2014 at 3:31 am

    Awesome, hope you like it!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 5, 2014 at 3:32 am

    Hello Reut, I have much less experience with the powder than the husk, but from my understanding it should work the same. Try using a little bit less of the powder, maybe only 3 Tbsp 🙂

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    March 21, 2014 at 6:44 pm

    Absolutely love this bread-I'm addicted! I know it sounds odd, but for some reason, to me, it has a taste similar to grits. It's yummy toasted and topped with ghee. My only complaint, for some reason the sides of my loaf do not get brown (?). Thanks for this delicious recipe.

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    March 21, 2014 at 6:44 pm

    Absolutely love this bread-I'm addicted! I know it sounds odd, but for some reason, to me, it has a taste similar to grits. It's yummy toasted and topped with ghee. My only complaint, for some reason the sides of my loaf do not get brown (?). Thanks for this delicious recipe.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 23, 2014 at 2:07 am

    Yay, I'm so please to here this! I totally see what you mean about it tasting like grits – it does have a cornbread like quality. About the sides of the bread, that might be an result of the pan you are using. I used a old bread tin, but if you use a newer, or non stick pan, you might not get the colour you desire. All the best! <3

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 23, 2014 at 2:07 am

    Yay, I'm so please to here this! I totally see what you mean about it tasting like grits – it does have a cornbread like quality. About the sides of the bread, that might be an result of the pan you are using. I used a old bread tin, but if you use a newer, or non stick pan, you might not get the colour you desire. All the best! <3

  • Reply
    Kelly @ Kelly Bakes
    March 28, 2014 at 2:49 pm

    I found your blog from my friend Kris @ 80twenty and I'm so glad she posted this recipe. Your photos are gorgeous and this bread looks so healthy and lovely. I have several friends who limit their gluten who I know will appreciate this recipe. Thank you for sharing it!

  • Reply
    Crysta Caprio
    March 31, 2014 at 9:09 pm

    I did it in my Vitamix with coconut oil. Turned out great! We used it for burgers that night!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    April 1, 2014 at 1:58 am

    So pleased you found the site, Kelly! Thank you very much for your kind words, I hope you and your friends enjoy the bread <3

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    April 1, 2014 at 2:00 am

    Awesome, Crysta! I'm so glad you liked the bread 🙂

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    April 7, 2014 at 11:28 pm

    This looks wonderful, and I'm excited to try it. Did you use whole or hulled millet?

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    April 7, 2014 at 11:28 pm

    This looks wonderful, and I'm excited to try it. Did you use whole or hulled millet?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    April 9, 2014 at 1:00 am

    Awe, thanks! I used hulled millet for the bread 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    April 9, 2014 at 1:00 am

    Awe, thanks! I used hulled millet for the bread 🙂

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    April 17, 2014 at 2:34 pm

    I've never made bread before so this was easier than expected! I followed the recipe to the letter and it turned out great. I can see what you mean – it doesn't taste like bread per se, but the texture is fantastic and it holds its shape really well. Love that I'm not having to eat sugary unhealthy gluten free breads when I can have whole grains! Thanks!!

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    April 17, 2014 at 2:34 pm

    I've never made bread before so this was easier than expected! I followed the recipe to the letter and it turned out great. I can see what you mean – it doesn't taste like bread per se, but the texture is fantastic and it holds its shape really well. Love that I'm not having to eat sugary unhealthy gluten free breads when I can have whole grains! Thanks!!

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    May 10, 2014 at 9:02 am

    I don't have much experience baking and I don't even have a regular oven. I made the bread according to your instructions and baked it in my toaster oven. I put it in a wide square pan and baked it for over 2 hours. The outer layer came out thick and crispy, but the center is soft and seems undercooked. It's still okay because toasting individual pieces solves the problem, but I wanted to know if you can give me any tips on how to improve my next batch. I have to say, this bread is delicious and is a life saver. I was very surprised on my first bite. Couldn't believe how good it was! By the way, I don't have gluten or any other sensitivity, but I am vegan and try to eat healthy and nutrient dense foods. Thanks for this recipe 🙂

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    May 10, 2014 at 9:02 am

    I don't have much experience baking and I don't even have a regular oven. I made the bread according to your instructions and baked it in my toaster oven. I put it in a wide square pan and baked it for over 2 hours. The outer layer came out thick and crispy, but the center is soft and seems undercooked. It's still okay because toasting individual pieces solves the problem, but I wanted to know if you can give me any tips on how to improve my next batch. I have to say, this bread is delicious and is a life saver. I was very surprised on my first bite. Couldn't believe how good it was! By the way, I don't have gluten or any other sensitivity, but I am vegan and try to eat healthy and nutrient dense foods. Thanks for this recipe 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    May 21, 2014 at 4:27 am

    Hello, I'm so happy you like the bread, but that's too bad it didn't work out 100%. Unfortunatly, I don't have a ton of experience with baking in a toaster oven, but I have a feeling you might need to bake it a bit longer than a convential oven (as it might not maintain a constant tempurate the whole time). I haven't given it a try, but I wonder if making it in a muffin cup might be a little better….best of luch 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    May 21, 2014 at 4:27 am

    Hello, I'm so happy you like the bread, but that's too bad it didn't work out 100%. Unfortunatly, I don't have a ton of experience with baking in a toaster oven, but I have a feeling you might need to bake it a bit longer than a convential oven (as it might not maintain a constant tempurate the whole time). I haven't given it a try, but I wonder if making it in a muffin cup might be a little better….best of luch 🙂

  • Reply
    muicheng
    July 20, 2014 at 7:35 am

    What can I replace millet with if I do not have millet.

  • Reply
    muicheng
    July 20, 2014 at 7:35 am

    What can I replace millet with if I do not have millet.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    July 24, 2014 at 4:51 am

    If you don't have millet, you can try using all quinoa. The flavour will be a little more Earthy, but it will still make for good bread 🙂

  • Reply
    Joy Roxborough
    July 28, 2014 at 1:10 pm

    Hello Sophie,

    I am making this this weekend. But can I use honey instead of the maple syrup? (I've got honey and I just don't want to go out and buy maple syup as well . . .) thanks

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    July 28, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    Hello Joy,

    Yes, honey should work wonderfully in this recipe. I hope you enjoy the bread!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    July 28, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    Hello Joy,

    Yes, honey should work wonderfully in this recipe. I hope you enjoy the bread!

  • Reply
    Joy Roxborough
    July 31, 2014 at 2:32 pm

    Thank you! Will let you know how it goes!

  • Reply
    Joy Roxborough
    July 31, 2014 at 2:32 pm

    Thank you! Will let you know how it goes!

  • Reply
    Pat
    August 15, 2014 at 6:12 pm

    Would this absolutely require refrigeration? Could I just wrap it and leave it at room temperature?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    August 15, 2014 at 7:04 pm

    Hello Pat,
    Since quinoa is high in protein, it's probably best kept in the fridge (it might go moldy in a couple days if not). But if you plan on eating it quickly, it should be fine left out.

  • Reply
    Joy
    August 24, 2014 at 12:25 am

    My quinoa and millet are soaking for my bake tomorrow! Yaay!

  • Reply
    Joy
    August 24, 2014 at 12:25 am

    My quinoa and millet are soaking for my bake tomorrow! Yaay!

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    August 29, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Hi Sophie. I've made 2 loaves of your bread (using my Vitamix!), and the taste is absolutely delicious. However, the 1st time, I kept it in the oven for, like, 2 1/2 hours and it was still mushy in the middle. That time, I did 1 piercing with a knife at 45 minutes. The 2nd time, I kept it in for 3 hours!!! and it was still underbaked in the middle (though, less so). That time, I pierced it in 5 different places thinking the 1st time, maybe enough moisture/steam hadn't been released. I love the bread, and really want it to work. Any suggestions?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    August 31, 2014 at 1:06 am

    Hello,
    I'm so happy to hear that you've been enjoying the bread, but I'm not sure why it takes sooo long to cook! Umm, the only thing I can think, is that maybe because you are using such an awesome blender, that it is getting over blended. When I make it, the batter is about half smooth and half chunky. I think that piercing it more probably wouldn't help. The only other thing I can think is maybe we are using different pans.What size is the pan you are using? Mine was 8 x 4 1/2 inc or 20 cm by 11 cm (approx)

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    August 31, 2014 at 1:06 am

    Hello,
    I'm so happy to hear that you've been enjoying the bread, but I'm not sure why it takes sooo long to cook! Umm, the only thing I can think, is that maybe because you are using such an awesome blender, that it is getting over blended. When I make it, the batter is about half smooth and half chunky. I think that piercing it more probably wouldn't help. The only other thing I can think is maybe we are using different pans.What size is the pan you are using? Mine was 8 x 4 1/2 inc or 20 cm by 11 cm (approx)

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    August 31, 2014 at 4:45 pm

    Thank you so much for your response. I will definitely try leaving the batter chunkier, and I'll let you know what happens!

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    September 9, 2014 at 12:38 pm

    Hi, I just made this, and it looks rather good, But, while it was baking, and I didn't know about piercing it, so I hope this doesn't make it "sink" while cooling, I read about psyllium husk and I got confused about whether it's good or bad for you… as there seems to be a lot of pros and cons on line.

    Ruth Housman

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    September 15, 2014 at 1:33 am

    is hulled millet the same as raw millet?..

  • Reply
    Joy
    October 12, 2014 at 2:10 pm

    hi Sopie, I' going to try ths agin but with rice, oat groat and I ended up putting a bit of quinoainthe mae up the rice to the 3/4 cup. Am I treading on dangerous grond? LOL. I will let yu know how it goes.

  • Reply
    Joy
    October 12, 2014 at 2:10 pm

    hi Sopie, I' going to try ths agin but with rice, oat groat and I ended up putting a bit of quinoainthe mae up the rice to the 3/4 cup. Am I treading on dangerous grond? LOL. I will let yu know how it goes.

  • Reply
    Nenad Durutović
    October 28, 2014 at 3:42 am

    It's an ingenious recipe! Millet and psyllium turned out to be a perfect combination so I'm interested can I cut the amount of husks down to 2 spoons?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    November 2, 2014 at 12:18 am

    Hello Nenad,
    thank you kindly, I'm so happy you liked the bread. You can most likely reduce the psyllium without causing much of a problem. It might make the bread a little more crumbly, but it shouldn't affect it much more than that. Just a reminded that you'll also have to reduce the water a bit too, so add it slowly until the right consistency is reached. Best of luck!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    November 2, 2014 at 12:18 am

    Hello Nenad,
    thank you kindly, I'm so happy you liked the bread. You can most likely reduce the psyllium without causing much of a problem. It might make the bread a little more crumbly, but it shouldn't affect it much more than that. Just a reminded that you'll also have to reduce the water a bit too, so add it slowly until the right consistency is reached. Best of luck!

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    November 11, 2014 at 8:57 am

    I just made this tonight and it came out wonderfully tasty, thanks so much for the recipe 🙂

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    November 11, 2014 at 8:57 am

    I just made this tonight and it came out wonderfully tasty, thanks so much for the recipe 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    November 14, 2014 at 5:32 am

    That's awesome to hear! I'm so please you enjoyed it 🙂

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    November 19, 2014 at 8:08 am

    Would it be fine to not soak the quinoa as it gives me stomach ache when I do soak it. But this looks like a really good sandwich bread,

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    November 19, 2014 at 8:08 am

    Would it be fine to not soak the quinoa as it gives me stomach ache when I do soak it. But this looks like a really good sandwich bread,

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    January 4, 2015 at 10:36 pm

    I'm sorry…. what is Psyllium husk??? XD

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    January 5, 2015 at 4:12 am

    So sorry for this late reply! I don't know how the bread would turn out without soaking the grains. You might be able to do it, but you will likely need to add more water than suggested. Best of luck 🙂

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    January 5, 2015 at 4:17 am

    Psyllium husk is the outer casing of a seed. Although it is not digestible in itself, it provides good insoluble fibre and aids some digestion issues. It also acts as a binding agent as it soaks up liquids well, like in this recipe. It's sold in health food stores as either the loose husks or in powder. All the best, Sophie

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 13, 2015 at 11:58 pm

    I've never tried psyllium husk in gf baking before. I tried your recipe several times with no success. They would start to over-rise in the oven after about 10-15 min's. I like baking breads so I know what a good rise is. So at the 45 min mark, I would poke them, they would continue to bake, a few were unstable and once poked, would deflate partially. After baking the breads for the 90 min's, within a few min's after taking them out of the oven, they would sink. Thinking this is an altitude problem, I changed the recipe for one of the breads and reduced the baking soda. No that didnt help. I reduced the liquid, No that didnt help. Any suggestions? Also, the recipe says the mixture would ball up. Mine never did. I used a processor. Based upon your experience, at what point is the mixture over-mixed, what does that look like. I would appreciate your help. Thanks

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 13, 2015 at 11:58 pm

    I've never tried psyllium husk in gf baking before. I tried your recipe several times with no success. They would start to over-rise in the oven after about 10-15 min's. I like baking breads so I know what a good rise is. So at the 45 min mark, I would poke them, they would continue to bake, a few were unstable and once poked, would deflate partially. After baking the breads for the 90 min's, within a few min's after taking them out of the oven, they would sink. Thinking this is an altitude problem, I changed the recipe for one of the breads and reduced the baking soda. No that didnt help. I reduced the liquid, No that didnt help. Any suggestions? Also, the recipe says the mixture would ball up. Mine never did. I used a processor. Based upon your experience, at what point is the mixture over-mixed, what does that look like. I would appreciate your help. Thanks

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 14, 2015 at 12:39 am

    Hello!
    So yeah, this bread is pretty strange, and the psyllium basically has a mind of its own which includes risings beautifully then sinking (which is rather disappointing). You can see how even my loaf sunk on the second picture down. Unfortunately this has nothing to do with your altitude, but more with the way it reacts. At the bottom of the recipe I have included a chia option that yields a denser loaf which doesn't have the issue of sinking. You might prefer to try that one.
    As far as the mixing goes, you want to make sure that there is almost an equal ratio of "batter" or purred gloop to whole seeds. If you puree too long, you'll just end up with something that looks like pancake batter, and thats where I'd say its over-mixed. When I make my loafs, I also use a food processor, however, it's about 35 years old. Maybe new ones have a lot more power and don't behave in the same manner. I'd say your mix is ready when it reaches that state of half dough and half seeds. Oh, I hope this helps you.
    Best of luck,
    Sophie

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    February 14, 2015 at 12:39 am

    Hello!
    So yeah, this bread is pretty strange, and the psyllium basically has a mind of its own which includes risings beautifully then sinking (which is rather disappointing). You can see how even my loaf sunk on the second picture down. Unfortunately this has nothing to do with your altitude, but more with the way it reacts. At the bottom of the recipe I have included a chia option that yields a denser loaf which doesn't have the issue of sinking. You might prefer to try that one.
    As far as the mixing goes, you want to make sure that there is almost an equal ratio of "batter" or purred gloop to whole seeds. If you puree too long, you'll just end up with something that looks like pancake batter, and thats where I'd say its over-mixed. When I make my loafs, I also use a food processor, however, it's about 35 years old. Maybe new ones have a lot more power and don't behave in the same manner. I'd say your mix is ready when it reaches that state of half dough and half seeds. Oh, I hope this helps you.
    Best of luck,
    Sophie

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    February 14, 2015 at 1:18 am

    Sorry, I'm going to rewrite my entry from above..I have more time now. I was in a hurry earlier, my son had to get to practice. So, here is what happened. I made several batches of your recipe thinking if I follow the recipe, everything was good. After several tries, the same thing kept happening. First, the mixture never balled-up as the recipe indicated. Mine was liquid for the first two min's and then it would turn into a jelly-like mixture. So I stopped processing it at 2 1/2 min's. I did try one at 3 mins. Wasnt sure at what point as your recipe indicates that it is overmixed? What does the mixture look like if it is overmixed? After about 10-15 min's in the oven, the bread was doubled, some tripled in size, most of them were odd-shaped–they looked like a "yeast bread" that was over-proofed. At the 45 min mark, i poked them. A few maintained their shape even though they were odd shaped, others fell and again became even more odd shaped. I took them out at 90 min's, they didnt look like bread. Within 2 min's they lost any air in them. And that's the strange thing, there was a huge gap between the crust and the crumb. The crumb was moist, wet and gummy, not like a bread crumb nor what your pictures look like. A few of the loaves had web-like structures in them. Im at 4000ft+ and so I was thinking it could be the altitude. I reduced the baking soda on one. Same thing happened to the bread as before..it didnt look like bread. So that wasnt it. On one of them the liquid was reduced. Again, the same thing happened as before. I even changed the warm water to cold thinking that might do it. So, looking at the chemistry of it, the breads are rising way too fast and too high in the oven within the first 15 min's therefore making them very unstable. The oven temp was 320 in a convection oven. Not sure how to get the recipe to cooperate and what am I doing that is causing the bread to rise that fast. I bake a lot with gf flours and such. But, I have never used psyllium husk in my recipes either. So, I'm not sure about this. I would love to try it again. but i dont want to waste any more product. Can you help me? I would so appreciate this. Thanks very much

    • Reply
      Cherry
      July 20, 2016 at 4:49 am

      Just took my bread out of the oven. Hardly fell at all while cooling. I made mine in large muffin tin. Also cooked mine ten minutes longer than specified. Is absolutely wonderful and will do over and over again. Wonder if I had such good success because I soaked the grains 24 hours. Anyway it is wonderful and better than described by author. Was a bit hard to get out of pan but nothing you cannot live with.

  • Reply
    Sheral Graham
    March 1, 2015 at 7:35 am

    Just made this. A bit hard to get out of the pan. Ran knife along edge after cooling for 15 minutes on rack. Gently pried out with fork. still warm. Will report back with taste test.

  • Reply
    Sheral Graham
    March 1, 2015 at 7:35 am

    Just made this. A bit hard to get out of the pan. Ran knife along edge after cooling for 15 minutes on rack. Gently pried out with fork. still warm. Will report back with taste test.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 2, 2015 at 2:55 am

    Awesome, I hope you enjoy!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 2, 2015 at 2:55 am

    Awesome, I hope you enjoy!

  • Reply
    jaehne
    March 2, 2015 at 3:50 pm

    When subbing oil for applesauce, how much applesauce should I use? 3Tbsp?

  • Reply
    jaehne
    March 2, 2015 at 3:50 pm

    When subbing oil for applesauce, how much applesauce should I use? 3Tbsp?

  • Reply
    jaehne
    March 2, 2015 at 3:50 pm

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • Reply
    jaehne
    March 2, 2015 at 3:50 pm

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 6, 2015 at 8:01 pm

    Yes, I would totally try starting with three tablespoons. Best of luck!

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    March 6, 2015 at 8:01 pm

    Yes, I would totally try starting with three tablespoons. Best of luck!

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    March 31, 2015 at 3:24 pm

    Hi Sophie, this sounds amazing and I can't wait to try it!! Any chance you have a breakdown on the nutrional value? I am beginning a diet and keeping track of what I consume. Thanks!
    P.S. Sorry I replied as "anonymous," but I couldn't figure out how to reply with my name (Mary).

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    April 26, 2015 at 1:40 pm

    If you look up "recipe nutritional analysis calculator" a number of free online caclulators will come up. (Joceyn)

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    April 26, 2015 at 1:53 pm

    I did it in a Vitamix (with apprehension!) – it came out even better than I'd hoped!

    I did it in two batches as you suggested. I therefore mixed the soaked psyllium husks with the liquids and everything except the grains so I could add half of everything at once to the half of the soaked grains that I began with.

    I was worried that I did not have a clear sense of what "overmixed" would look like, especially since I knew the mixing time would be different since I was using a fairly current Vitamix. I did need to use the Vitamix tamper, but only a little – within a minute, it had a distinctly doughy texture that pulled away from the sides, so that ended up being easy to see when it was sufficiently mixed. I had thought it would be difficult to scrape it out of the blender, but it mostly just dropped out in one mass. I then did the other half, which was the same. I added that dough to the first half of the dough, gave a few stirs, and it was ready for the pan.

    I don't know if it had any effect, but I decided that in addition to scoring the bread at the halfway point that I would run a knife through it before putting it in the oven as well. Since there's really no way to tell when it's done (since a knife inserted at the end will pull out sticky no matter what), I decided to play it safe and gave it an extra 20 minutes at the end.

    It was really beautiful – it hardly sank at all!

    Thank you for this wonderful recipe.

    I wonder if the problem some people may be having is that they're not sure what it should look like when the dough is sufficiently mixed without being over mixed? So I will say (admittedly, from my one-time experienced, which could be beginner's luck!) that you should stop when it has a distinctly doughy consistency that mostly pulls away from the sides of the blender/food processor.

    (Jocelyn)

  • Reply
    Anonymous
    April 26, 2015 at 1:53 pm

    I did it in a Vitamix (with apprehension!) – it came out even better than I'd hoped!

    I did it in two batches as you suggested. I therefore mixed the soaked psyllium husks with the liquids and everything except the grains so I could add half of everything at once to the half of the soaked grains that I began with.

    I was worried that I did not have a clear sense of what "overmixed" would look like, especially since I knew the mixing time would be different since I was using a fairly current Vitamix. I did need to use the Vitamix tamper, but only a little – within a minute, it had a distinctly doughy texture that pulled away from the sides, so that ended up being easy to see when it was sufficiently mixed. I had thought it would be difficult to scrape it out of the blender, but it mostly just dropped out in one mass. I then did the other half, which was the same. I added that dough to the first half of the dough, gave a few stirs, and it was ready for the pan.

    I don't know if it had any effect, but I decided that in addition to scoring the bread at the halfway point that I would run a knife through it before putting it in the oven as well. Since there's really no way to tell when it's done (since a knife inserted at the end will pull out sticky no matter what), I decided to play it safe and gave it an extra 20 minutes at the end.

    It was really beautiful – it hardly sank at all!

    Thank you for this wonderful recipe.

    I wonder if the problem some people may be having is that they're not sure what it should look like when the dough is sufficiently mixed without being over mixed? So I will say (admittedly, from my one-time experienced, which could be beginner's luck!) that you should stop when it has a distinctly doughy consistency that mostly pulls away from the sides of the blender/food processor.

    (Jocelyn)

  • Reply
    Trudy
    May 15, 2015 at 2:20 am

    Thank you so much for sharing your recipe. This is quite good. The bread rises so beautifully but deflates big time leaving a huge gap between the crust and the crumb. How do you make it look like the one in the picture?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    May 30, 2015 at 10:06 pm

    Poking it to allow the steam to escape will help this issue 🙂 Yu might need to poke it one during baking and once as soon as it comes out. Best of luck and am glad you're enjoying it

  • Reply
    Emma Pascoe
    August 4, 2015 at 1:14 am

    Hi, this looks great! I am doing candida diet at the moment and wondering if I can omit/substitute the maple syrup?

  • Reply
    Sophie - Wholehearted Eats
    August 17, 2015 at 9:39 pm

    Hey Emma! Yes for sure! Try replacing the maple syrup with whatever liquid or dry sweetener you like to use, or leave it out all together 🙂

  • Reply
    Jasmine Hanly
    August 31, 2015 at 9:40 pm

    Hi, I have made this bread recipe before and it was delicious, thank you so much for sharing the recipe! I was wondering if it can be made oil free?

  • Reply
    Tea
    December 2, 2015 at 10:03 am

    Hi! I'm excited about your recipe and really wanna try it, but am feeling a bit anxious after reading some of the troubles that people had. Could you please tell me which 'speed' you used on your food processor (mine is also very old, but has that dial to turn and choose the speed of the blade turns). Did you use a lower or higher speed?
    Also, One thing that comes to my mind is what if adding an egg would help with retaining the shape of the bread, so that it doesn't deflate so much? Have you maybe tried that already, in your many attempts at bread? My logic is that an egg (or possibly just an eggwhite?) would solidify due to the high temperature and thus help the bread hold its structure. Am I on to something?

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